Solidarity: Scenes From Phoenix's Black Lives Matter Protests

Solidarity: Scenes From Phoenix's Black Lives Matter Protests

Three weeks after the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, protesters remain on the streets of Phoenix, just as they do in most American cities.

Every night, they gather and march and ask for justice for black people. They demand accountability from the police department. They mourn the death of not just Floyd but Dion Johnson, a black man killed by an Arizona Department of Public Safety trooper on the same day.

Early on, there was vandalism, looting, and arrests: anger and rage. The governor declared an 8 p.m. curfew for a week. But the demonstrations since have settled into a peaceful and mostly predictable daily activity, something like a religious act. There is no sign the protests will let up soon.

This historic national moment will not lack for documentation. Armed with smartphones, the participants are often the reporters and photographers, beaming out tweets and Facebook posts and Instagram Live videos to the rest of the world. Wanting to commit some of the protest images to print, we asked three local photographers for their photos.


Three weeks after the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, protesters remain on the streets of Phoenix, just as they do in most American cities.

Every night, they gather and march and ask for justice for black people. They demand accountability from the police department. They mourn the death of not just Floyd but Dion Johnson, a black man killed by an Arizona Department of Public Safety trooper on the same day.

Early on, there was vandalism, looting, and arrests: anger and rage. The governor declared an 8 p.m. curfew for a week. But the demonstrations since have settled into a peaceful and mostly predictable daily activity, something like a religious act. There is no sign the protests will let up soon.

This historic national moment will not lack for documentation. Armed with smartphones, the participants are often the reporters and photographers, beaming out tweets and Facebook posts and Instagram Live videos to the rest of the world. Wanting to commit some of the protest images to print, we asked three local photographers for their photos.
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