^
Keep New Times Free
4
| Art |

15 Social Justice Murals in Metro Phoenix — and Where to Find Them

Artist Ashley Macias painted this portion of a collaborative Black Lives Matter mural in Roosevelt Row.EXPAND
Artist Ashley Macias painted this portion of a collaborative Black Lives Matter mural in Roosevelt Row.
Lynn Trimble

Phoenix artists have a long history of painting murals that call attention to social justice issues. Here’s a look at 15 metro Phoenix murals that bear important messages about racial equality, immigration, and more.

La Morena painted this mural, which honors murdered and missing indigenous women, near The Churchill.EXPAND
La Morena painted this mural, which honors murdered and missing indigenous women, near The Churchill.
Lynn Trimble

No More Stolen Sisters

Lucinda “La Morena” Hinojos
First and Garfield streets

La Morena, an artist with Latinx and indigenous roots, painted one of several murals in an alleyway next to The Churchill. The small-scale mural is meant to raise awareness about missing and murdered indigenous women.

Lalo Cota and Tato Caraveo painted this mural addressing gun violence, which is located at Carly's Bistro.EXPAND
Lalo Cota and Tato Caraveo painted this mural addressing gun violence, which is located at Carly's Bistro.
Lynn Trimble

We Can End Gun Violence

Lalo Cota and Tato Caraveo
First and Roosevelt streets

Moms Demand Action and Carly’s Bistro commissioned this mural painted by Lalo Cota and Tato Caraveo on the eastern wall of Carly’s Bistro in Roosevelt Row. The mural includes Cota’s characteristic use of skeleton imagery.

New Say Their Names billboard by Karen Fiorito going up on Grand Avenue.EXPAND
New Say Their Names billboard by Karen Fiorito going up on Grand Avenue.
Lynn Trimble

Say Their Names Billboard


Karen Fiorito
Grand and 11th avenues

California artist Karen Fiorito created a new design for the Grand Avenue Billboard Project organized by artist Beatrice Moore. One side includes the faces of several Black victims of police violence. The other features a voting-themed graphic.

Hugo Medina led a team that painted this mural about immigrant rights near the Downtown YMCA.EXPAND
Hugo Medina led a team that painted this mural about immigrant rights near the Downtown YMCA.
Lynn Trimble

Immigration Murals

Hugo Medina
First Avenue south of Van Buren Street

Hugo Medina worked with community members on side-by-side murals addressing immigrant rights. One mural depicts a girl releasing monarch butterflies from a cage. The other features portraits of a diverse group of immigrants.

Artist bacpac created this mural as the nation protested the death of George Floyd.EXPAND
Artist bacpac created this mural as the nation protested the death of George Floyd.
Beth Hall Malapanes

The Price of Black Lives

Jeremie 'bacpac' Franco
Oak and 15th streets

Jeremie “bacpac” Franco painted a mural addressing police brutality and the May 25 death of George Floyd. The design sets Floyd’s face in the center of a $20 bill, referencing the fact that police detained him for allegedly using a counterfeit $20 bill at a convenience store.

Part of La Morena's immigrant rights mural on Central Avenue in South Phoenix.EXPAND
Part of La Morena's immigrant rights mural on Central Avenue in South Phoenix.
Lynn Trimble

Unlocking Your Potential and Freedom

Lucinda “La Morena” Hinojos
Central Avenue and Illini Street

La Morena painted this immigrant rights mural as part of a project called "Colors of La Communidad." The central image is a young field worker setting caged doves free, surrounded by butterflies that represent America’s Dreamer generation.

Six artists worked together to create this Black Lives Matter mural in Roosevelt Row.EXPAND
Six artists worked together to create this Black Lives Matter mural in Roosevelt Row.
Lynn Trimble

Black Lives Matter Mural

Multiple Artists
Third Street south of Roosevelt Street

Six artists worked together to transform a wall in Roosevelt Row into a Black Lives Matter mural featuring the faces of several victims of police brutality. Artists painted different sections of the wall, using floral designs to separate the portraits that put a human face on the issue of racial justice.

Bacpac tackled the issue of school shootings in the Oak Street alley near 14th Street.EXPAND
Bacpac tackled the issue of school shootings in the Oak Street alley near 14th Street.
Lynn Trimble

School Violence Mural

Jeremie 'bacpac' Franco
Oak and 14th streets

Jeremie “bacpac” Franco painted this mural that shows a student seated at a desk, with his face in the crosshairs of a gun. She painted the piece to raise awareness about the tragedy of school shootings.

Colibri brought artists together to address immigration for this mural on Grand Avenue.
Colibri brought artists together to address immigration for this mural on Grand Avenue.
Lynn Trimble

Colibri Mural

Multiple Artists
Grand and 10th avenues

Several artists participated in this mural project inspired by the work of Colibri Center for Human Rights, a Tucson organization that helps to identify immigrants who’ve died in the desert along the U.S.-Mexico border.

This collaborative mural is one of several inspired by protests against police brutality.EXPAND
This collaborative mural is one of several inspired by protests against police brutality.
Lynn Trimble

Love Fights Back

Multiple Artists
Van Buren Street and 15th Avenue

Several artists worked together on this mural inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement. The artwork elevates the value of peaceful protest with images that reference the Arizona flag and landscape, as well as border-related injustice.

Section of Angel Diaz's mural created in response to SB 1070, which he painted behind Barrio Cafe.EXPAND
Section of Angel Diaz's mural created in response to SB 1070, which he painted behind Barrio Cafe.
Lynn Trimble

SB 1070 Mural

Angel Diaz
16th Street Alley north of Thomas Road

Angel Diaz painted a mural with multiple scenes related to America’s history of racism, inspired by Arizona’s controversial SB 1070 legislation adopted in 2010 with support by former Sheriff Joe Arpaio, among others.

This mural on Seventh Street north of McDowell Street was painted after Dion Johnson was killed on May 25.EXPAND
This mural on Seventh Street north of McDowell Street was painted after Dion Johnson was killed on May 25.
Lynn Trimble

Justice for Dion

Giovannie “Just” Dixon”
Seventh Street north of McDowell Road

Giovannie “Just” Dixon painted a tribute to Dion Johnson, a Black man killed by a Department of Public Safety trooper in Phoenix on May 25. The small-scale mural pictures Johnson with a halo over his head.

Hugo Medina painted this mural, located at Palm Lane and 40th Street, depicting immigrant children being held in cages.EXPAND
Hugo Medina painted this mural, located at Palm Lane and 40th Street, depicting immigrant children being held in cages.
Lynn Trimble

Never Again

Hugo Medina
40th Street north of McDowell Road

Hugo Medina painted a mural addressing Trump policies that have resulted in immigrant children being placed in cages. The mural includes imagery from the American flag, as well as children peering out from behind bars.

One of several murals in a Roosevelt Row alley that address police brutality.EXPAND
One of several murals in a Roosevelt Row alley that address police brutality.
Lynn Trimble

Say Her Name

Collaborative Mural
Fifth and Roosevelt streets

I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Phoenix and help keep the future of New Times free.

This piece is one of many new murals painted in a Roosevelt Row alley where artists have been painting different artworks for many years. The mural is one of several painted in Phoenix amid Black Lives Matter protests.

La Morena painted this mural, which addresses immigrant family separation, near the Arizona Capitol.EXPAND
La Morena painted this mural, which addresses immigrant family separation, near the Arizona Capitol.
Lynn Trimble

Family Separation Mural

Lucinda 'La Morena' Hinojos
Washington Street and 14th Avenue

La Morena painted this mural near the Arizona State Capitol, in an area of Phoenix where protesters have often marched for social justice causes. The mural addresses the separation of immigrant families at the border.

Keep Phoenix New Times Free... Since we started Phoenix New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Phoenix, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Phoenix with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Phoenix.

 

Join the New Times community and help support independent local journalism in Phoenix.