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Best Phoenix Concerts This Weekend: Iron Maidens, The Joeys, Andy Warpigs Tribute

The life, legacy, and music of the late Andy Warpigs will be celebrated at Margaret T. Hance Park on Sunday, June 13.EXPAND
The life, legacy, and music of the late Andy Warpigs will be celebrated at Margaret T. Hance Park on Sunday, June 13.
Benjamin Leatherman
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This weekend, the local music scene will gather underneath the bridge at Margaret T. Hance Park in downtown Phoenix to pay tribute to the life and music of the late Andy Warpigs with an outdoor celebration and vigil.

Other noteworthy concerts and music events happening around the Valley from Friday, June 11, to Sunday, June 13, include gigs by esteemed local jazz and blues artists, a performance by an all-female Iron Maiden tribute, and pool parties featuring electronic dance music stars and local hip-hop selectors.

Details about each of these events can be found below.

The Iron MaidensEXPAND
The Iron Maidens
Alex Solca

Iron Maidens

Friday, June 11
Marquee Theatre, 730 North Mill Avenue, Tempe, 480-829-0707

Tribute bands are a dime a dozen these days, but the all-female Iron Maidens have been the best at making a successful career out of paying homage to the heavy metal legends. Like their male counterparts, the Maidens have toured the world and become a global phenomenon. Led by vocalist “Bruce Chickinson,” this is the rare tribute act that is worth going out of your way to check out live, which you can do on Friday night at Tempe’s Marquee Theatre. Openers include Rush tribute Freewill and local metal acts Empire of Dezire and Oddity Paradox. Showtime is 6:30 p.m. and tickets are $25 for general admission, $35 for balcony seating. Jason Roche

Local blues legend Carvin Jones.EXPAND
Local blues legend Carvin Jones.
Carvin Jones' Facebook

Carvin Jones

Friday, June 11
Rosie McCaffrey’s, 906 East Camelback Road, 602-241-1916

If you're a Valley resident who hasn't heard of guitarist Carvin Jones, it's likely that you've been doing a little carvin' of your own, holed up in some cavernous hermitage. Since 1989, Carvin has been sauntering his way across the universe with Phoenix as his launchpad, and his six-string the chauffeur.

Though he plays the blues, the Texas native has little to be blue about, having logged 6,000-plus performances, including opening for the likes of B.B. King and Santana. A mainstay on the international festival circuit, Carvin's Hendrix-esque stage charisma coupled with his SRV-flavored chops have garnered him success on the majority of earth's inhabitable continents. He’s gotten kudos from Guitar Magazine and even Eric Clapton. On Sunday night, he’ll perform at Rosie McCaffrey’s starting at 8:30 p.m. Admission is free. Rob Kroehler

Erick Orrosquieta, better known as EDM artist Deorro.
Erick Orrosquieta, better known as EDM artist Deorro.
Prodigy Artists

Deorro

Friday, June 11
Sunbar Tempe, 24 West Fifth Street, Tempe, 480-687-8409

Learning music production and DJing was an obsession for Erick Orrosquieta, better known as Deorro. As a teenager growing up in Southern California, Deorro hung out at Guitar Center, where the employees let him experiment with a display DJ mixer. He was still crossfading from one track to the next until a stranger showed him how to mix tracks and beat-match.

Parties led to club nights, and Deorro cultivated a following among house-music enthusiasts. He worked for promoters handing out flyers, and worked his connections until he was booked to play various high-profile gigs. He eventually gave up his onetime dreams of being a trauma surgeon and go with Plan B: making music.

A decade later, Deorro is an international success story. He’s a regular at EDM’s biggest festivals, and his original productions – many released through his own label, Panda Funk – are staples in his peers' setlists. He may not be saving lives in a hospital, but he’s still safeguarding people in his role as a mentor to the DJ community. He’s scheduled to headline the Salsa de Sunbar party on Friday night in Tempe, which starts at 9 p.m. Admission is $39.50. Patrick Shannon

Francine Reed is scheduled to perform on Wednesday, January 9, at Kerr Cultural Center.EXPAND
Francine Reed is scheduled to perform on Wednesday, January 9, at Kerr Cultural Center.
Fervor Records

Francine Reed

Saturday, June 12
The Nash, 110 East Roosevelt Street, 602-795-0464

Francine Reed is a bonafide treasure. Born into a family of musicians, which included her late sister (and fellow vocalist) Margo, Reed has spent a good portion of her life performing, dating back to her time singing gospel music in church while growing up in Illinois.

From the mid-’70s onward, she’s been lighting up venues around the Valley with her brassy voice and lively personality. Back in the day, you could find her at such famed-but-bygone Phoenix-area spots as Boojum Tree, Chuy’s, or Bombay Bicycle Club. And when she wasn’t thrilling local audiences with her talents, Reed was sharing stages with the likes of Miles Davis, Etta James, Stanley Jordan, and Smokey Robinson (she’s also a longtime member of Lyle Lovett’s Large Band).

This weekend, you can catch Reed onstage at The Nash during a pair of showcases on Saturday evening, which are her first shows at the Roosevelt Row jazz joint in more than a year. Tickets are $54 to $59 for the 7 p.m. performance and $49 to $55 for her 9 p.m. session. Benjamin Leatherman

Attendees of the Desert Splash Pool in 2018.EXPAND
Attendees of the Desert Splash Pool in 2018.
Benjamin Leatherman

Desert Splash Pool & Pajama Party

Saturday, June 12
DoubleTree by Hilton Phoenix, 7475 West Chandler Blvd., Chandler, 480-961-4444

It may have taken last summer off (for obvious reasons), but pool party season in the Valley is in full swing. On any weekend, there are a variety of swim celebrations happening at local hotels or other venues equipped with a pool, each with its own vibe and music selection. Case in point: the annual Desert Splash in Chandler, which is aimed at fans of hip-hop, trap, and R&B sounds — and anyone who wants to party hard for 13 hours straight.

The stylish event will be a round-the-clock rager that will consist of a “Miami-style” pool party during the daytime, followed by a pajama party after dark. The poolside festivities kick off at 1 p.m. with spins from DJ Pest, DJ Tru Star, DJ Tiggz, and others. Separate swimsuit and male hardbody contests for cash prizes will take place and food, drinks, games, giveaways, and vendors are also promised. The pajama party is from 10 p.m. until 2 a.m. General admission is $40, which covers all activities. VIP tickets are $65 and include a gift package and complimentary daiquiri. More info is available here. Benjamin Leatherman

The Joeys

Sunday, June 13
The Rebel Lounge, 2303 East Indian School Road, 602-296-7013

To anyone who grew up in an era when there was no shortage of guitar-slinging heroes, it gladdens the heart to see a band like The Joeys find a new means of expression in a form as old and marginalized as rock ’n’ roll seems these days.

Teenaged guitarist Dean Cheney knows rockabilly isn’t exactly on everyone’s speed dial, but he is undeterred. And The Joeys play rockabilly with a fervor that you makes you remember rock was once the music of the young made for the young. Cheney’s love of rock legends extends to having an orange Gretsch just like Eddie Cochran and singing into the retro ribbon mics Elvis Presley used to leer into.

But make no mistake, Cheney, drummer Hayden Lamm, and bassist Luci Cormany – all of whom are School of Rock alumni – aren’t a novelty act. Cheney’s ease around the fretboard would make James Burton proud. And the rhythm section is so on the money that it’s hard to believe they didn’t even know what rockabilly was a few years ago. They’ve got a new music video out (for their track “Planet Z”) and will perform on Sunday at The Rebel Lounge. Locals Blu Joy, The Reztones, and Gnarwhal Jrz open the 7 p.m. show. Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Serene Dominic

Folk-punk artist Andy Warpigs, who died on May 30.EXPAND
Folk-punk artist Andy Warpigs, who died on May 30.
Logan Lowrey-Rasmussen (@Loganjlr1994)

Andy Warpigs Folk-Punk Celebration & Vigil

Sunday, June 13
Margaret T. Hance Park, First and Moreland streets

Andy Warpigs had a profound effect on the Phoenix music landscape. The late folk-punk artist, who used the pronouns they/them, was an altruistic soul who championed inclusivity and encouraged others to follow their passions and join in. So it’s only fitting that members of the local scene have come together in support of Warpigs since their death on May 30, including raising $18,000 through a GoFundMe campaign to cover funeral costs and help out their mother, Lynn Johnson.

This weekend, many of Andy’s friends and fellow musicians will gather underneath the Central Avenue bridge at Margaret T. Hance Park, a spot where Warpigs occasionally performed, from 3 to 11 p.m. on Sunday to celebrate of the late folk-punk artist’s life and music. The lineup will include Jerusafunk, Blood Feud Family Singers, Red Tank!, A Better Problem, Soft Deadlines, The Bittersweet Way, and Of the Earth. Local artist NXOEED will also conduct an art hunt and a candlelight vigil at The Trunk Space, 1124 North Third Street, will take place following the performances. It’s free to attend but donations are encouraged. Complete details are available here. Benjamin Leatherman

Paige Lopynski is Bonnie and Daniel Litman is Clyde.EXPAND
Paige Lopynski is Bonnie and Daniel Litman is Clyde.
Koury Angelo

Bonnie X Clyde

Sunday, June 13
Maya Dayclub, 7333 East Indian Plaza, Scottsdale, 480-625-0528

Since 2015, Bonnie X Clyde has been EDM's favorite vigilante duo. Hailing from Virginia, Daniel Litman and Paige Lopynski met in high school, but their collaboration didn't come to fruition until they were miles apart. While in college – Litman at the University of Miami and Lopynski at Virginia Tech – the pair began working together over the internet.

After college, Lopynski moved to Miami, where they formed Bonnie X Clyde. By 2016, they were playing major festivals, touring extensively, and developing a dogged fanbase dubbed “The Rosegang.” Still, if you aim to breakthrough as an artist, Miami can only get you so far. After three years in the Magic City, Bonnie X Clyde decamped to Los Angeles.

The change of scenery hasn't affected the pair's chemistry, though. In the studio, Litman and Lopynski's production has a softer edge, thanks to Lopynski's airy vocals. In a live setting, Bonnie X Clyde tends to skew toward a grittier, bass-to-the-face experience, with Lopynski often singing live. Inspired by the likes of Rüfüs Du Sol and Tame Impala, they strive to deliver something more than your standard DJ set. See what we mean this weekend when the pair plays The Sunday Drip pool party at Maya in Scottsdale. Gates open at noon and the duo will perform in the late afternoon. Tickets are $10. Grant Albert

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