The Eagles, Kevin Gates and the best concerts in Phoenix this January | Phoenix New Times
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The Eagles, Kevin Gates and the best concerts in Phoenix this January

The first month of 2024 will also include gigs by Cody Johnson, The Maine and Black Flag.
Kevin Gates is scheduled to perform Desert Diamond Arena in Glendale on Jan. 13.
Kevin Gates is scheduled to perform Desert Diamond Arena in Glendale on Jan. 13. Jimmy Fontaine
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January is a unique month for concerts in the Valley. After a brief post-holiday lull, things get back into a groove as legendary artists and blockbuster tours start rolling into music venues across the Phoenix area.

This month is no exception. From mid-January onward, a parade of big names are scheduled to perform in the Valley. Iconic rock bands the Eagles and Foreigner. Chart-topping rappers like Kevin Gates and Young Nudy. Country music star Cody Johnson and gutterbilly act The Goddamned Gallows. Punk stalwarts Black Flag and rising hyperpop artist Ericdoa. Britpop bands The Charlatans U.K. and Ride.

Other highlights of January’s concert calendar include several notable local music events, like the Full Moon Festival’s seventh-anniversary celebration, a 16-piece ensemble performing music from Wes Anderson’s films and the return of Phoenix Art Museum’s PhxArt Amplified event.

Read on for details about these gigs and the rest of Phoenix's best concerts in January or check out our music listings for even more shows around the Valley.

Brian Lopez

Friday, Jan. 5
Valley Bar, 130 N. Central Ave.
Indie singer-songwriter Brian Lopez has had the sort of career that many musicians could admire. Hailing from Tucson, the classically trained artist has starred in influential Arizona psych-rock bands Mostly Bears and XIXA, been a member of esteemed desert noir ensemble Giant Sand and performed alongside Calexico and Nouvelle Vague. As a solo artist, Lopez has toured with DeVotchKa and Marianne Dissard, bringing his operatic voice and southwestern-tinged style of indie chamber pop to venues worldwide. In early January, Lopez will take center stage at Valley Bar in downtown Phoenix to celebrate the release of his acclaimed fourth full-length album “Tidal.” The 10-track album has been described as a “breezy, dreamy [collection] of psychedelic chamber pop unfurling like the wings of a newly hatched butterfly.” Famed local steel guitarist Jon Rauhouse — who has collaborated with the likes of Neko Case, Jakob Dylan and Billy Bob Thornton’s Boxmasters — will open. 7 p.m., $18/$22 via ticketweb.com. Benjamin Leatherman

That 1 Guy

Saturday, Jan. 6
Valley Bar, 130 N. Central Ave.
Think of a one-man band: cymbals on the elbows, drum on the back, horns under the arms and tambourines on the knees creating a cacophony designed to annoy passersby. Now, try to envision That 1 Guy, a.k.a. Mike Silverman, as he takes the one-man band concept to a whole new level with the wide-ranging sounds created on his homemade Magic Pipe. In fact, this 1 Guy sounds like a handful as he drifts through prog-rock overtures, funk dance grooves, avant-classical passages and mind-melting free jazz expressionism. Though Silverman does have structured songs, his background practically dictates a need for improvisation and going off on sonic adventures. In early January, he’s set to bring his Alchemical Gnarality tour to downtown Phoenix. 7:30 p.m., $17/$20 via ticketweb.com. Glenn BurnSilver

Smoking Popes

Sunday, Jan. 7
Yucca Tap Room, 29 W. Southern Ave., Tempe
Hailing from Illinois, the quartet of Smoking Popes have been serving up sugar rush pop-punk and grungy guitar riffs across seven albums and decades of touring. Records like 1995's “Born to Quit” and 1997's “Destination Failure” are gems of rock ‘n’ roll brevity — the Smoking Popes blaze through their tracklists in under an hour, packing in a bevy of hooks and snarky lyrics delivered by lead vocalist and guitarist Josh Caterer’s quavering voice. Even though the blasphemously named band found religion when Caterer converted to Christianity in 1998, they still know how to be profane like any good punk band. Come on down to Yucca Tap Room on the first Sunday in January to hear them kick out the jams and bless the crowd with their crunchy alt-rock hosannas. With The Dreaded Laramie and Bad Cop/Bad Cop; 8 p.m., $20 via ticketweb.com. Ashley Naftule
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Long live the king.
Sam Howzit/CC BY 2.0/Wikimedia Commons

Elvis Presley Birthday Bash

Sunday, Jan. 7
The Rhythm Room, 1019 E. Indian School Rd.
It’s been 46 years since Elvis Presley’s death, and the undisputed king of rock ’n’ roll is still being feted to this day. To wit: A slew of local rockabilly, blues and Americana artists will pay tribute to the King during the annual Elvis Presley Birthday Bash at on Sunday at the Rhythm Room. Local pinup queen Brenda Lee will emcee the affair, which will include performances by Pat Roberts, Jamie Waldron, The Tin Can Screamers, Suzie and the AcceleratorZ, Mario Moreno, Jacob Woodside, Washboard Jere and Jimmy Pines, The Ukabillies, Che Nemeth and many others. Proceeds will benefit the Elvis Presley Charitable Foundation. 5 p.m., $10 at the door. Benjamin Leatherman

The Charlatans U.K. and Ride

Monday, Jan. 8
The Van Buren, 401 W. Van Buren St.
Anglophiles rejoice. Prepare for a night of shoegazing and head-nodding when two indie legends from across the pond come to America. U.K. bands The Charlatans and Ride are titans of (respectively) Madchester and shoegaze, two music scenes centered around pushing rock music into new sonic dimensions. For those unfamiliar, Madchester was a late-’80s/early-’90s British music scene closely tied to the indie dance scene of the era and was like guitar rock on ecstasy, mixing in baggy dance beats and party vibes with acerbic vocals and lyrics. Meanwhile, the country’s shoegaze scene gave rise to bands like Ride that used their pedals and feedback to create psychedelic levels of guitar distortion, reverb and warped melodicism. Both the Charlatans and Ride exemplify what made those scenes great. The Charlatans are an ace party band, playing songs like “The Only One I Know” and “One to Another” that are full of decadence and jubilations. Ride’s thunderous guitar playing on albums like Nowhere and Going Blank Again will necessitate the use of earplugs for anyone catching their set. Come for the dance-rock, stay for the tinnitus. 8 p.m., $39.50-$89.50 via livenation.com. Ashley Naftule.

Slaughter Beach, Dog

Thursday, Jan. 11
Crescent Ballroom, 308 N. Second Ave.
Slaughter Beach, Dog’s origins are rooted in failure, particularly in the collapse of singer Jake Ewald’s old group Modern Baseball. The emo mainstays went on indefinite hiatus in 2017, stymied by writer’s block and other issues. Ewald started Slaughter Beach, Dog as a way to break through his creative paralysis and it has become a vibrant second life for Ewald. Taking his emo roots in a new direction, Ewald threads in elements of Americana and folk into the band’s music, which isn’t afraid to throw a trombone in the mix alongside a raucous guitar lick. On 2023's “Crying, Laughing, Waving, Smiling,” the band’s fifth album, Ewald flexes his storytelling muscles, singing songs about love, God, depression and small-town life with a poet’s eye for detail. Ewald has come a long way from Modern Baseball, but he still knows how to knock it outta the park. With Sun June; 8 p.m., $25-$38 via ticketweb.com. Ashley Naftule

Al Stewart

Thursday, Jan. 11
Celebrity Theatre, 440 N. 32nd St.
Scottish-born singer, songwriter and musician Al Stewart is best known for such hit singles as 1976’s “Year of the Cat” and 1978's "Time Passages." His career goes back even further, as Stewart has a track record of success dating back to the 1960s British folk-rock revival. Richard Thompson, Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page and other guitar luminaries played on his records. He performed at the first Glastonbury Festival in 1970, and his album, “Love Chronicles,” released a year earlier, was voted "Folk Album of the Year" by the UK music publication Melody Maker and infamously was the first mainstream record to feature the word "fucking" in the lyrics. Whether or not Stewart will unleash any F-bombs during his upcoming performance with his band, the Empty Pockets, at Celebrity Theatre remains to be seen. You’re likely to hear a variety of hits and deep cuts from throughout his career, though, including “On the Border,” “Nostradamus” and “Roads to Moscow.” 7:30 p.m., $30-$60 via etix.com. Glenn BurnSilver

The Temptations and The Four Tops

Thursday, Jan. 11
Mesa Arts Center, 1 E. Main St., Mesa
Few groups hold as much acclaim in the realm of R&B, soul and Motown music as The Temptations and The Four Tops. Renowned for their harmonious melodies, hit songs and legendary performances, both groups helped shape the music industry and influence countless artists. Admittedly, the versions of The Temptations and The Four Tops scheduled to take the stage at Mesa Arts Center later this month will feature rosters that are vastly different from their respective heyday in the 1960s. The Temptations, best known for such songs as "My Girl" and "Papa Was a Rolling Stone,” have undergone multiple lineup changes but have preserved their trademark sound. They ain’t your grandparents’ Temptations, but they still can carry a tune quite spectacularly. Conversely, The Four Tops still include founding member Abdul “Duke” Fakir, who still can croon his way through such signature hits as "Reach Out (I’ll Be There)" and “I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch).” 7 p.m., $64.50-$99.50 via mesaartscenter.com. Benjamin Leatherman

Kid Congo and the Pink Monkey Birds

Saturday, Jan. 13
Yucca Tap Room. 29 W. Southern Ave., Tempe
As detailed in his memoir, “New Kind of Kick,” Brian Tristan (a.k.a. Kid Congo Powers) was kind of the Forrest Gump of the ’80s underground. The lean, smoky-eyed Powers has been a ubiquitous presence in the post-punk/death rock communities. He went from being a Cramps fanzine writer to playing guitar for his heroes, learning the ins and outs of shredding on six strings by playing with Jeffrey Lee Pierce’s seminal Gun Club. He even did time as a dapper sideman with Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. The Kid’s love of the Ramones and Chicano rock legends Thee Midniters inform his style, which is heavy on volume, distortion and drama. As a solo artist, he injects a decadent cabaret vibe into his music, combining sturdy roots rock with Kurt Weill. Backed by his Pink Monkey Birds, a Kid Congo Powers show is a tour through a half-century of exotica, punk, surf, rockabilly and other weird sounds. With The Rebel Set and Joan of Arkansas; 7:30 p.m., $15/$20 via ticketweb.com. Ashley Naftule
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Hitmaking rapper Kevin Gates headlines the latest Powerhouse concert.
Jimmy Fontaine

Power 98.3/96.1 Powerhouse

Saturday, Jan. 13
Desert Diamond Arena, 9400 W. Maryland Ave., Glendale
The folks at Valley radio station Power 98.3/96.1 tend to bring in hip-hop heavyweights to perform at their annual Powerhouse concerts. (To wit: Previous editions of the show have seen the likes of Snoop Dogg and Ice Cube taking the stage.) This year’s Powerhouse, which was originally scheduled to take place last summer but was postponed until January, will be no exception. Chart-topping rapper Kevin Gates — the Louisiana-born artist behind such hits as “Really Really,” “2 Phones” and “Me Too” — will headline the concert. Others scheduled to perform include trap/hip-hop artist Young Nudy (“Peaches & Eggplants”), Grammy-nominated hitmaker Joyner Lucas (“Your Heart”), Strange Music co-founder Tech N9ne (“Fragile”), motormouthed rapper Twista (“Slow Jamz”) and R&B singer-songwriter Eric Bellinger (“G.O.A.T.”). 5 p.m., $69-$125 via ticketmaster.com. Benjamin Leatherman

The Goddamn Gallows

Wednesday, Jan. 17
The Rhythm Room, 1019 E. Indian School Rd.
The leading purveyors of punk rock gutterbilly, The Goddamn Gallows got their start pummeling squats and rundown apartments with their fiery mix of mandolin, accordion, washboard, guitars, bass and drums. A small group, the trio of Mikey Classic, Fishgutzz and Amanda Kill can nevertheless conjure up a mighty racket. Having toured with firebrand showman The Reverend Horton Heat, The Goddamn Gallows share the holy man’s love of theatrics and vocal derangement. They don’t just incorporate country sounds into their dizzying punk rock stew; they also draw on the conventions of old-time church revivals and circus sideshows to create a throwback live experience. Nobody’s going to bite the head off a chicken but they play songs that make you think that could happen at any moment. With The Delta Bombers and Volk; 7:30 p.m., $30 via seetickets.us. Phoenix New Times
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The eclectic and influential Leo Kottke.
On Tour PR

Leo Kottke

Wednesday, Jan. 17 and Thursday, Jan. 18
Musical Instrument Museum, 4725 E. Mayo Blvd.
Leo Kottke is a true American original. While many folk legends have retired or moved on to the great hootenanny in the sky, the Georgia singer and acoustic guitarist continues to ramble on, filling music halls with his distinctive take on blues and folk music. Kottke is known for his unusual fingerpicking technique. Despite suffering from major tendon damage in his right hand, he’s been able to develop a crabbed yet expressive guitar style. Almost as unique is Kottke’s honking and breezy baritone, a style the singer has wryly described as “geese farts on a muggy day.” That eccentric, down-home comedic sensibility comes through in his live performances where Kottke will intersperse oddball monologues between his songs. Seeing Kottke live is like watching a well-lived, globe-trotting grandpa spin life stories and tall tales while he serenades you on his porch. Don’t miss your chance to hear his one-of-a-kind voice quaver in the MIM’s in-house concert venue during his two-night stint. 7 p.m., $49.50-$54.50 via mim.org. Ashley Naftule
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Car nirvana awaits at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale.
Jim Louvau

Rock the Block feat. Foreigner

Friday, Jan. 19
Westworld of Scottsdale, 16601 N. Pima Road
Classic cars will mix with classic rock when Foreigner brings its Feels Like the Last Time farewell tour to WestWorld to coincide with this year’s Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale Auction. The concert, which includes an opening set by Night Ranger, will take place a day before the launch of this year’s auction and will serve as a pre-party of sorts to the event. It’s rather fitting, considering Foreigner's various hits from over the decades — including such favorites as “Jukebox Hero,” "Long, Long Way from Home,” “Head Games” and "Double Vision" — have aged just as well as the vintage automotive gems up for auction each year at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale. 8 p.m., $59-$249 via axs.com. Benjamin Leatherman

Eagles

Friday, Jan. 19, and Saturday, Jan. 20
Footprint Center, 201 E. Jefferson St.
How much time do we have left before the Eagles revival is fully upon us? Everything gets a critical reappraisal eventually. Fleetwood Mac, Hall & Oates, ABBA and Steely Dan were all punchlines at one point and have since been reclaimed as avatars of pop perfection. How much longer can we live in this beautiful world where the Eagles are still considered cheesy? Despite being the subject of ridicule by hipsters around the world, the Eagles have gone platinum so many times that only Michael Jackson can challenge their best-selling bona fides. People can’t get enough of the band’s mellow, drinking-tequila-at-last-call country-rock vibes. Listen to any classic rock radio and their songs are inescapable. They may not have respect but they have the world. Even though the Eagles are in the midst of their ongoing farewell tour, none of us will ever leave the Hotel California, no matter how hard we try. With Steely Dan; 7:30 p.m., tickets are available on the secondary market. Ashley Naftule
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The Maine, from left: Jared Monaco, Patrick Kirch, John O’Callaghan, Kennedy Brock and Garrett Nickelsen.
The Maine

The Maine

Friday, Jan. 19 and Saturday, Jan. 20
The Van Buren, 401 W. Van Buren St.
“I disregard the pessimism, disappoint the algorithm,” Josh O’Callaghan sings on “Blame” off The Maine’s 2023 self-titled record. Nine albums in, homegrown Valley band The Maine are finding new ways to make themselves unclassifiable. Are they pop? Are they rock? Are they a dance band? On their latest release, they’re all of the above. Propelled by anthemic guitar hooks and the strong rhythmic interplay of bassist Garrett Nickelsen, drummer Patrick Kirch and rhythm guitarist Kennedy Brock, the Maine make an infectious brand of pop rock that’s laden with buzzy guitars and sweet synth sounds. There’s even a touch of disco swagger on songs like “Leave in Five.” The Maine’s ability to kick up a groove is what makes their music stick in your memory. They’re scheduled to visit The Van Buren this month for a two-night stop on their Sweet Sixteen tour. Both shows are officially sold out, but you can probably score tickets via resellers. With The Summer Set and Weathers (on Jan. 19) and Diva Bleach (on Jan. 20); 7:30 p.m. Ashley Naftule
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Members of La Luz de La Luna perform at PhxArt Amplified in 2019.
Benjamin Leatherman

PhxArt Amplified Vol. 3

Saturday, Jan. 20
Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N. Central Ave.
If there’s one question that continues to grow louder among museums and art institutions across the globe, it’s this: How can they stay relevant in the 21st century? Museums still serve as guardians of cultural history, but as communities increasingly come to expect that their institutions reflect them and their needs, these institutions’ self-reflection can allow new ideas to gain traction. In Phoenix, one of those ideas is Amplified, the annual music and arts festival that’s returning on Jan. 20 after a four-year hiatus. More than 50 bands and artist groups will take over the museum for a day, offering visitors not only the experience of a staggering number of acts in a single place, but also transforming the possibilities of the museum’s role in the community. Performances will takes in various indoor and outdoor spots throughout the museum, including the Dorrance Sculpture Garden. The lineup will include June McDoom, Little Jesus, Los Esplifs, Golden Boots, Pijama Piyama, Terminal 11, JPW, Tatiana Crespo, Flower Festival and many more. Noon, $40 via phxart.org. Paula Ibieta

Mayer Hawthorne

Saturday, Jan. 20
Crescent Ballroom, 308 N. Second Ave.
A multi-instrumentalist, producer and retro-soul singer par excellence, Mayer Hawthorne isn’t afraid to go for broke on the mic. Drawing influence from such velvety greats like Curtis Mayfield, Barry White and Smokey Robinson (along with more modern inspirations like J. Dilla and Santigold), Hawthorne's idiosyncratic take on neo-soul music caught the attention of fellow musician Peanut Butter Wolf, a man who also knows a thing or two about remixing and mining old sounds into pleasing new modern contexts. Hawthorne’s love of hip-hop and Detroit house music also flavors his vintage soul stylings, particularly on his latest album, 2023’s “For All Time.” With Chulita Vinyl Club; 7 p.m., $30-$45 via ticketweb.com. Ashley Naftule

Black Flag

Saturday, Jan. 20
Marquee Theatre, 730 N. Mill Ave., Tempe
Few bands — hardcore or otherwise — are as iconic as Black Flag. The Raymond Pettibon album covers, the “get in the van” touring ethos, the raucous L.A. concerts that would turn into police riots, the rotating door of legendary punk vocalists (including the legendary Henry Rollins), the instantly recognizable four black bar logo — so much of the band is steeped in iconography and history that it’s easy to forget that the music also kicked ass. “Damaged” and “My War” are two of the great rock records, steeped in sludgy atmospherics and ear-shredding riffs. What can you expect from seeing Black Flag in 2023? Not much of the original lineup, for starters. While Black Flag has always been guitarist/songwriter Greg Ginn’s baby, the band’s classic run featured a cast of players who were as critical to their sound and development as Ginn’s contributions. None of them are still in the band, as it's basically the Greg Ginn show now. While you won’t get to see Rollins bursting a vessel to “Depression,” you can still hear one of the all-time great punk guitarists shred his six-string while performing two sets, one of which will include every song from their iconic 1984 album "My War.” 8:30 p.m., $35-$89.48 via seetickets.us. Ashley Naftule

Dark Star Orchestra

Thursday, Jan. 25
Marquee Theatre, 730 N. Mill Ave., Tempe
Jerry Garcia may be gone and the surviving members of the Grateful Dead may have wound down their second life of touring with (checks notes) John Mayer, but the spirit of their ramshackle American burnout blues continues to keep on trucking. Dark Star Orchestra are far from the only band who’ve devoted themselves to covering and continuing the Grateful Dead’s legacy but few tribute bands put as much work into it as the DSO does. Hailing from Chicago, the Dark Star Orchestra have been vamping and picking since 1997. Their brand of emulation is so on-point that actual members of the Dead (including Bob Weir and Phil Lesh) have played with the band. Part of what makes the DSO experience so distinct is their commitment to recreating entire shows from the band’s past. They’ve been known to play setlists culled from actual Dead tours. They also have mastered the band’s entire catalog to the extent that they’ll sometimes improvise entire sets on any given night, playing what they feel without a safety net. Seeing them in 2023 is as close as you’re going to get to the Dead experience without eating some bad acid or having to listen to Tim Leary talk about the Tibetan Book of the Dead. 8 p.m., $46.68-$73.69 via seetickets.us. Ashley Naftule

The Hot Sardines

Tuesday, Jan. 23 and Wednesday, Jan. 24
Musical Instrument Museum, 4725 E. Mayo Blvd.
It takes a rare breed of musician to cite both Bugs Bunny and Louis Prima as musical influences, but the hepcats behind The Hot Sardines are anything but normal. Hailing from NYC, the multi-musician ensemble are a hot jazz band in a cultural era that's cool on the things they love (like Fred Astaire movies, Django Reinhardt, the Andrews Sisters, and Fats Waller). Spearheaded by pianist Evan Palazzo and singer/washboard player Elizabeth Bougerol (who can sing in both English and French), The Hot Sardines have a knack for winning over jazz skeptics with their energetic and playful interpretations of old standards. Notorious for improvising during every show, you’ll never hear them play the same song the same way twice. Their shared background in theater also informs their cabaret-style presentation, which leans heavily on goofy showmanship, call-and-responses with the audience and dance. If you’re looking for an excuse to dust off your dance shoes and practice your finger snaps, get up for the get-down when The Hot Sardines bring their show to the MIM. 6:30 p.m., $49.50-$59.50 via mim.org. Ashley Naftule

Cody Johnson

Saturday, Jan. 27
Desert Diamond Arena, 9400 W. Maryland Ave., Glendale
More than a few country music purists might’ve raised an eyebrow when Cody Johnson was touted as “the next George Strait” several years ago. While those are admittedly some big cowboy boots to fill, Johnson has already crafted an impressive career. Often likened to Strait for his traditional sound, heartfelt delivery and commitment to staying true to country music's roots, the Texas-born recording artist stands out for his distinctive voice and stage presence. His rise from riding bulls on the rodeo circuit to topping charts with hit albums like 2016’s “Gotta Be Me” and 2019’s “Ain’t Nothin’ To It” not only solidifies his talents as a performer but also his heartland bona fides. Johnson is touring behind his latest album, 2023’s “Leather,” which charted highly on the Billboard 200 after its release last fall. With Justin Moore and Dillon Carmichael; 7:30 p.m., tickets are available on the secondary market. Benjamin Leatherman

Ericdoa

Saturday, Jan. 27
Crescent Ballroom, 308 N. Second Ave.
“I wear my feelings high, it gets the best of me,” Eric George Lopez, better known as Ericdoa, sings on “ocd,” one of the standout tracks on 2022’s “Things With Wings.” The lyric holds true for much of his work: Lopez doesn’t have much of a poker face. The singer, songwriter and producer lets it all out on his manic and complex songs. Lopez is one of the leading lights in the modern hyperpop scene. Interweaving dance music with EDM, hip-hop, pop and bits of abstracted noise, hyperpop often sounds like a computer experiencing a massive sugar rush. Lopez’s music has a similar quality: his songs bristle and overflow with elastic basslines, snapping beats and bubbling soundscapes of melody and electronic texture. Often producing his own beats, the singer/rapper got his start self-releasing music on SoundCloud before building a large enough following that his music has appeared on Euphoria & Valorant. No wonder he sings about having OCD when he’s juggling this many balls. With Bixby; 8 p.m., $20/$23 via ticketweb.com. Ashley Naftule
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A scene from a previous Full Moon Festival.
Benjamin Leatherman

Full Moon Festival: Wolf Moon

Saturday, Jan. 27
Fear Farm, 6801 N. 99th Ave., Glendale
If you didn’t attend Full Moon Festival’s long-awaited return last month, the popular lunar-themed event has undergone a few changes. (For starters, it’s now taking place outdoors on the grounds of Fear Farm in Glendale.) Full Moon Festival’s organizers remain committed to their mission of elevating the music, art and culture scenes in Arizona. The event is still an outdoor playground filled with colorful and unique thrills, trippy visual displays, immersive environments and unique characters. Later this month, the festival will celebrate its seventh anniversary with a massive party inspired by January’s Wolf Moon and that’s filled with surprises and five different stages of music. The lineup will include Dirtybird artist/producer Ton Kench, hip-hop/punk act Dadadoh and the POC, indie pop band Divided Minds and the DJs of Techno Snobs. At midnight, festival organizers and attendees will attempt to set a world record for the largest simultaneous howl at the moon. 8 p.m., $30-$200 via aftontickets.com. Benjamin Leatherman
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The Van Buren in downtown Phoenix.
Benjamin Leatherman

The Sonoran Dispatch: Wes Anderson Soundtrack Live

Saturday, Jan. 27
The Van Buren, 401 W. Van Buren St.
When people talk about the films of Wes Anderson, his dollhouse aesthetic is usually the thing they focus on. Throughout 11 films Anderson has developed a unique style, one that weaves together aesthetic touchstones like Edward Gorey, New Yorker illustrations and 1950s cinema into brightly colored artifice. What gets talked about less often is his golden ear: the man kills it when it comes to picking great songs (from Bowie to French chanson) to soundtrack his films. This fact isn’t lost on the folks behind The Sonoran Dispatch. The 16-piece ensemble is presenting an evening of whimsical and winning music recreating selections from Wes Anderson’s films in arrangements put together by local musician and composer Dr. Christopher Norby. Expect to hear some Kinks, Francoise Hardy and Seu Jorge numbers, along with instrumentals drawn from Alexandre Desplat and Mark Mothersbaugh’s original scores. Costumes are encouraged. 7:30 p.m., $38 via livenation.com. Ashley Naftule
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The Nile Theater in Mesa.
Benjamin Leatherman

Fucked Up

Tuesday, Jan. 30
The Nile Theater, 105 W. Main St., Mesa
Since 2001, hardcore band Fucked Up has carved out a significant body of work, threading the needle between punk’s spittle-spraying rage and prog’s insane ambition. Few bands have worked so hard to redeem the idea of concept albums as Fucked Up, who’ve released several complex narrative-driven records, along with a lot of seven-inch records and zodiac-themed EPs. Driven by the creative tension between singer Damian Abraham’s meat and potatoes punk ethos and guitarist Mike Haliechuk's experimental impulses, Fucked Up albums are dense and intimidating to approach, but — much like a lengthy novel — are worth the effort to tackle. Speaking of tackling: You haven’t lived until you’ve been bounced around in a Fucked Up mosh pit. Feel the joy and adrenaline of being a human pinball for yourself when these Canadian greats invade The Nile. 7 p.m., $23 via simpletix.com. Ashley Naftule

Sunny War & Chris Pierce (a.k.a. War & Pierce)

Wednesday, Jan. 31
Musical Instrument Museum, 4725 E. Mayo Blvd.
Singer-songwriters Sunny War and Chris Pierce make beautiful, beguiling roots music together as War & Pierce. The pair work together so well, their voices twinning together like the swirl inside a yin-yang, that it’s almost shocking that they haven’t been collaborating all this time. War and Pierce have each made names for themselves as solo artists before a chance meeting with a mutual producer friend led to them recording a one-off song, “Any Day Now.” Collaborating on the tracks proved to be such a lighting-in-a-bottle situation that the pair decided to keep working together, leading to a self-titled EP and string of well-received singles (including their stirring anti-police brutality song “Mercy”). Buoyed by Pierce’s warm voice and War’s distinctive, loose style of guitar playing, the duo’s warm melodies seep into your bones. 7 p.m., $38.50-$49.50 via mim.org. Ashley Naftule
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