Grilled by reporters after several felony counts against her were dropped in November, former beauty queen Jill Scott -- an ex-Mrs. America and Mrs. Arizona best known for her appearances on local TV commercials for her ex-husband's Empire Glass windshield replacement company -- talked to the press corps about the ordeal. "It's been humiliating," said Scott, whose ex-husband claimed she'd stolen money from his company. "I've lost about five years of elasticity in my skin."
Tempe's "A" Mountain is not the city's only painted butte. Head west on Broadway Road, and look south just before you hit the I-10 freeway, to check out the side of Double Butte -- about halfway up. There, just below a white painted cross, is the word "labia" in large letters. We have no idea how it got there; we're just happy as a, well, clam that it is.
You've seen them as you drive along, those "Adopt-A-Highway" signs, usually featuring the name of a local anti-litter philanthropist.

But even jaded motorists will do a double take at the name emblazoned on several signs near the entrance to the Lost Dutchman State Park. Instead of bearing the names of the sponsoring do-gooders, these signs merely declare: "In loving memory of John Denver."

Yes, that John Denver. The "Rocky Mountain High" singer lived in the Rocky Mountains and died in 1997 when the plane he was piloting crashed near Monterey, California.

So why the Arizona tribute? Seems it's part of some fans' efforts to get John Denver Adopt-A-Highway signs -- and roadside cleanups -- in all 50 states.

Far out!

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